Renewable energy futures to 2050: Current thinking and options for cities – Eric Martinot

We held a lunchtime seminar with Eric Martinot, author of the REN21 Renewables Global Futures Report, a pioneering synthesis of the full range of credible possibilities for the future of renewable energy. View the presentation:

Renewable energy futures to 2050: Current thinking and options for cities part 1 (PDF)
Renewable energy futures to 2050: Current thinking and options for cities part 2 (PDF)

Dr. Martinot presented some findings from his recent work, the REN21 Renewables Global Futures Report. This report provides a synthesis of the full range of credible possibilities for the future of renewable energy. The report is not one scenario or viewpoint, but captures the contemporary thinking of 170 leading experts from around the world, including CEOs and parliamentarians, as expressed in face-to-face interviews with the author. The report also incorporates the results of 50 recently published and prominent energy scenarios by a range of organizations. The report looks at future shares of energy, investment levels, technology development, and the range of integration options for electric power grids, buildings, industry, and transport. It also highlights the role of local governments and presents visions, practices, and policies for incorporating renewable energy at the local/city level.

Eric Martinot is an internationally recognized scholar, writer, and teacher on the subject of renewable energy. He is report author of the REN21 Renewables Global Futures Report, and was lead author until 2010 of the REN21 Renewables Global Status Report, an annual synthesis that he first created in 2005. He currently serves as senior research director with the Institute for Sustainable Energy Policies in Tokyo and teaching fellow with Victoria University of Wellington. He also maintains research affiliations with the Worldwatch Institute and the Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association, and is an editorial board member for the journal Energy Policy. He lived in Beijing for three years as senior visiting scholar at Tsinghua University, and was formerly a senior energy specialist with the World Bank. He has written 70 publications on renewable and sustainable energy since 1990, and holds a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley and a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

This was a joint New Zealand Centre for Sustainable Cities and Institute for Governance and Policy Studies event, held on Thursday 12 September 2013.

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